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Tom Jones Volume 2 Henry Fielding

Tom Jones Volume 2

Henry Fielding

Published
ISBN : 9781230219196
Paperback
158 pages
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1861 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER XI. The historyMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1861 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER XI. The history draws nearer to a conclusion. When Mr. Western was departed, Jones began tc inform Mr. Allworthy and Mrs. Miller, that his liberty had been procured by two noble lords, who, together with two surgeons, and a friend of Mr. Nightingales, had attended the magistrate by whom he had been committed, and by whom, on the surgeons oaths, that the wounded person was out of all manner of danger from his wound, he was discharged. One only of these lords, he said, he had ever seen before, and that no more than once- but the other had greatly surprised him, by asking his pardon for an offence he had been guilty of towards him, occasioned, he said, entirely by his ignorance who he was. Now the reality of the case, with which Jones was not acquainted till afterwards, was this: -- The lieutenant whom Lord Fellamar had employed, according to the advice of Lady Bellaston, to press Jones, as a vagabond, into the sea-service, when he came to report to his lordship the event which we have before seen, spoke very favourably of the behaviour of Mr. Jones on all accounts, and strongly assured that lord that he must have mistaken the person, for that Jones was certainly a gentleman- insomuch that his lordship, who was strictly a man of honour, and would by no means have been guilty of an action which the world in general would have condemned, began to be much concerned for the advice which he had taken. Within a day or two after this, Lord Fellamar happened to dine with the Irish peer, who, in a conversation upon the duel, acquainted his company with the character of Fitzpatrick- to which indeed he did not do strict justice, especially in what related to his lady. He said, she was the most innocent, the most injured woman alive, and that...